Donnie Darko Soundtrack Gets New Vinyl Release

True to form for a retro reboot, the 2001 cult classic film Donnie Darko is reissuing the release of the movie score onto vinyl. NME reports that this medium won't be in stores for a prolonged period. Instead being a limited edition as it celebrates its 15th anniversary in 2016.

For those hipsters that love their music on the good old turntable, the soundtrack is getting a limited repress on green marble vinyl. It was put together by composer Michael Andrews but includes tracks by INXS, Tears for Fears, Duran Duran, The Church, Joy Division and other 80s classics.

All to help paint the picture of suburban American life in 1988.

Even Post 90s Films Are Getting The Nostalgia Treatment

If you're starting to feel a bit old these days, then it is a sobering thought to see films made in the 2000s getting 15th anniversary reissues. The new and improved version will hit the market this week on Friday October 14. But you will have to get in quick.

Not only are the pre-sales sold out, but the rest of the limited 300 copies are likely to be snapped up in no time. The soundtrack, which includes the superb Andrews and Gary Jules' rendition of 'Mad World' from the 1982 Tears for Fears song, still stands the test of time after all these years.

Donnie Darko Ending Still Confuses A Lot Of The Audience, But That Was OK

Donnie Darko is the go-to movie if you want to reference a film that wasn't only confusing at the time of viewing, but days or months later. Not only was Jake Gyllenhaal's performance hauntingly brilliant, but the psychological elements made the small budget flick a memorable experience that is hard to forget.

Modern studios are now always conscious of feeding an exorbitant amount of information to the plot details. This has become a downfall of blockbusters like Batman v Superman and a host of other features that can't grasp the idea that a bit of ambiguity can go a long way. Darko manages to capture the imagination by exploring religious and science fiction topics like tangent universes, time travel and people returning from the dead. All while never talking down to the audience. With today's releases, such substance would have taken at least an extended exposition or two.

How movies have lost their way since then.

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